Compound Management: Guidelines for Compound Storage, Provision, and Quality Control

Sue Holland‐Crimmin1, Paul Gosnell1, Chad Quinn1

1 Platform Technology and Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Collegeville, Pennsylvania
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Chemical Biology
Unit Number:   
DOI:  10.1002/9780470559277.ch110095
Online Posting Date:  September, 2011
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Abstract

The scientific discipline of compound management has developed significantly over the last decade, as witnessed by the large number of conferences dedicated to this topic. The key elements of compound management include (1) the management, storage, and processing of both solids and liquids; (2) compound delivery and interface with key customers; (3) performance of instruments and automation that support these operations; (4) analytical techniques used for quality assurance; and (5) sample informatics, including registration, routing, and compound quality data. This article incorporates guidelines, best practices, and experimental protocols for these key aspects of compound management. Curr. Protoc. Chem. Biol. 3:141‐152 © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords: adaptive focused acoustics; AFA; compound management; CM; high throughput screening; HTS; quality assurance; QA; volatile solvent transfer; VST

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Solid Compound Management
  • Compound Solubilization
  • Solution Libraries and DMSO
  • The Importance of Quality
  • Conclusion
  • Literature Cited
  • Figures
  • Tables
     
 
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Materials

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Figures

  •   FigureFigure 1. Comparison of dissolution of chloroquine at 10 mM nominal concentration by vortex treatment, sonication, and AFA (Nixon et al., ).
  •   FigureFigure 2. Phase diagram for water‐dimethylsulfoxide system.
  •   FigureFigure 3. Sample weight change of 5‐µl samples stored in 384‐well plates at −20°C under different conditions (water absorption and evaporation).
  •   FigureFigure 4. Sample weight of 5‐µl samples stored in 384‐well plates at 24°C, 10% relative humidity, under different conditions (water absorption and evaporation).
  •   FigureFigure 5. Analysis of the purity, concentration and water content of a range of samples after different numbers of freeze‐thaw cycles.
  •   FigureFigure 6. Correlation of activity in an ion channel FLIPR screen: comparison of plates freshly prepared as compared to those stored at −20°C sealed for 6 months.
  •   FigureFigure 7. Schematic for performing a carryover study on a Tecan Genesis.

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
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   Nie, D., Hilton, A., and Gosnell, P. 1996. DMSO in HTS: The effect of water absorption and evaporation. Society for Biomolecular Screening, 3rd Annual Conference, Baltimore, Md.
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   Rasmussen, D.H. and MacKenzie, A.D. 1968. Phase diagram for the system water‐dimethylsulfoxide. Nature 220:1315‐1317.
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