Microscope Objectives

Joseph LoBiondo1, Mortimer Abramowitz2, Marc M. Friedman3

1 Nikon Instruments, Melville, New York, 2 Olympus America, Central Valley, Pennsylvania, 3 AccuMed International, Chicago, Illinois
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Cytometry
Unit Number:  Unit 2.2
DOI:  10.1002/0471142956.cy0202s58
Online Posting Date:  October, 2011
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Abstract

The objective is the most crucial image‐forming component of a microscope. A knowledge of the many types of objectives available and their characteristics is critical to the selection of appropriate objectives for image cytometry. This unit discusses aberrations in image formation and their correction, construction, and types of objectives, and objectives for other microscopy applications, explaining the advantages and limitations of each one. Curr. Protoc. Cytom. 58:2.2.1‐2.2.15. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords: imaging and microscopy; confocal microscopy; light microscopy

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Image Fidelity
  • Properties of Microscope Objectives
  • Construction and Types of Microscope Objectives
  • Modern Objectives
  • Objectives for Other Microscopy Applications
  • Other Considerations in Choosing Objectives
  • Literature Cited
  • Figures
     
 
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Materials

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Figures

Literature Cited

   Abramowitz, M. 1994. Optics: A Primer. Olympus America Inc., New York.
Key References
   Abramowitz, M. 1985. Microscope Basics and Beyond. Olympus Corporation, New York.
   Abramowitz, M. 1987. Contrast Methods in Microscopy: Transmitted Light. Olympus Corporation, New York.
   Abramowitz, M. 1993. Fluorescence Microscopy: The Essentials. Olympus America Inc., New York.
   Abramowitz, 1994. See above.
   Bradbury, S. 1984. An Introduction to the Optical Microscope. Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.
   Delly, J.G. 1988. Photography Through The Microscope. Eastman Kodak, Rochester, N.Y.
   Inoue, S. 1986. Video Microscopy. Plenum Press, New York.
   Leitz, E. 1938. The Microscope And Its Application. Ernst Leitz, Wetzlar, Germany.
   Mollring, F.K. 1976. Microscopy From The Very Beginning. Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany.
   Spencer, M. 1982. Fundamentals of Light Microscopy. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K.
Internet Resources
  http://www.microscopyu.com
  Web site featuring technical support and timely information about all aspects of optical microscopy.
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