Components of Quality Control

Anne A. Hurley1

1 Comprehensive Cytometric Consulting, Ballwin, Missouri
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Cytometry
Unit Number:  Unit 3.2
DOI:  10.1002/0471142956.cy0302s00
Online Posting Date:  May, 2001
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Abstract

The purpose of a control is to aid the operator in deciding whether an analytical system is producing reliable results for a given assay, and ultimately whether to release the results. This unit presents information on the techniques for determining when results are in control or out of control.

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Literature Cited
  • Figures
  • Tables
     
 
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Materials

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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
   Allen, J.R., Earp, R., Farrell, C.E., and Gruemer, H.D. 1969. Analytical bias in a quality control scheme. Clin. Chem. 15:1039.
   Grannis, G.F., Gruemer, H.D., Lott, J.A., Edison, J.A., and McCabe, W.C. 1972. Proficiency evaluation of clinical chemistry laboratories. Clin. Chem. 18:222.
   Levey, S. and Jennings, E.R. 1950. The use of control charts in the clinical laboratory. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 20:1059.
   Sax, S.M., Dorman, L., Lebenson, D.D., and Moore, J.J. 1967. Design and operation of an expanded system of quality control. Clin. Chem. 13:825.
   Westgard, J.O. and Groth, T. 1983. A predictive value model for quality control: Effects of the prevalence of errors on the performance of control procedures. Am. J. Clin. Pathol. 80(1):49‐56.
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