Data Management

David R. Parks1

1 Stanford University, Stanford, California
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Cytometry
Unit Number:  Unit 10.1
DOI:  10.1002/0471142956.cy1001s00
Online Posting Date:  May, 2001
GO TO THE FULL TEXT: PDF or HTML at Wiley Online Library

Abstract

This unit presents a broad view of flow cytometry data management, emphasizing ways to create and manage data so as to maximize their immediate and long‐term usefulness. The cost in time, money, and effort to create data files in the first place argues for the importance of making full use of files and keeping them from getting lost or becoming uninterpretable. As flow cytometry measurements become increasingly complex, researchers have more and more reasons to reexamine old data. Careful data management is clearly necessary to ensure that stored data contain enough information about an experiment to enable analysis and interpretation by others even years later.

     
 
GO TO THE FULL PROTOCOL:
PDF or HTML at Wiley Online Library

Table of Contents

  • Why Flow Cytometry Data is Worth Managing
  • A Broad View of Data Management
  • Specific Features of Flow Cytometry Data Management
  • Literature Cited
     
 
GO TO THE FULL PROTOCOL:
PDF or HTML at Wiley Online Library

Materials

GO TO THE FULL PROTOCOL:
PDF or HTML at Wiley Online Library

Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

   Bigos, M. and Moore, W.A. 1996. Data compression for flow cytometry. Cytometry 8(Suppl.):125.
   Cook, T. 1995. It's 10 o'clock—Do you know where your data are? Technol. Rev. 98:48‐53.
   Data File Standards Committee of the Society for Analytical Cytology, 1990. Data file standard for flow cytometry. Cytometry 11:323‐332.
   Durack, G., Lawler, G., Kelley, S., Ragheb, K., Roth, R.A., Ganey, P., and Robinson, J.P. 1991. Time interval gating for analysis of cell function using flow cytometry. Cytometry 12:701‐706.
   Moore, W.A. 1984. A modern computer system for collection, management and analysis of flow cytometry data. XII International Meeting of the Society for Analytical Cytology Abstr. C49.
   Moore, W.A. 1987. Software for management of flow cytometry data. Cytometry 1(Suppl.):12.
   Moore, W.A. and Bigos, M. 1990. A distributed data processing system for flow cytometry. Cytometry 4(Suppl.):88.
   Parks, D.R. 1997. Flow cytometry instrumentation and measurements. In Handbook of Experimental Immunology, Vol. 2 (L.A. Herzenberg, D.M. Weir, C. Blackwell, and L.A. Herzenberg, eds.) pp. 50.1‐50.11. Blackwell Science, Cambridge, Mass.
   Parks, D.R. and Bigos, M. 1990. Automatic standardization, compensation adjustment and instrument diagnosis for flow cytometers. Cytometry 4(Suppl.):70.
   Parks, D.R. and Bigos, M. 1997. Collection, display, and analysis of flow cytometry data. In Handbook of Experimental Immunology, Vol. 2 (L.A. Herzenberg, D.M. Weir, C. Blackwell, and L.A. Herzenberg, eds.) pp. 47.1‐47.12. Blackwell Science, Cambridge, Mass.
   Robinson, J.P., Durack, G., and Kelley, S. 1991. An innovation in flow cytometry data collection and analysis producing a correlated multiple sample analysis in a single file. Cytometry 12:82‐90.
   Robinson, J.P., Ragheb, K., Lawler, G., Kelley, S., and Durack, G. 1992. Rapid multivariate analysis and display of cross‐reacting antibodies on human leukocytes. Cytometry 13:75‐82.
   Treister, A.S., Bigos, M., Herzenberg, L.A., Moore, W.A., Parks, D.R., Roederer, M., and Herzenberg, L.A. 1996. Experiment‐based flow cytometry data analysis software. Cytometry 8(Suppl.):121‐121.
Internet Resources
   http://nucleus.immunol.washington.edu/ISAC.html
  Homepage of the International Society for Analytical Cytology (ISAC), with link available to a full listing of FCS 3.0.
GO TO THE FULL PROTOCOL:
PDF or HTML at Wiley Online Library