Mouse Colony Management

David A. Conner1

1 Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Molecular Biology
Unit Number:  Unit 23.8
DOI:  10.1002/0471142727.mb2308s57
Online Posting Date:  February, 2002
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Abstract

The management of mouse colonies created by gene targeting is described in this unit. It defines guidelines necessary to establish the colony, and describes screening for germline transmission, marking the mice for easy and consistent identification, and genotyping DNA by PCR or Southern blotting analysis. It also reviews the software currently available for colony data management.

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Colony Establishment, Expansion, and Maintenance
  • Mouse Identification
  • DNA Preparation for Genotype Analysis
  • Information Management
  • Literature Cited
  • Figures
  • Tables
     
 
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Materials

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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

   Festing, M.F.W., Simpson, E.M., Davisson, M.T., and Mobraaten, L.E. 1999. Revised nomenclature for strain 129 mice. Mammalian Genome, 10:836.
   Hogan, B., Beddington, R., Constantini, F., and Lacy, E. 1994. Manipulating the Mouse Embryo: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, New York.
   Kolesnikov, Y., Jain, S., Wilson, R., and Pasternak, G.W. 1998. Lack of morphine tolerance in 129/SvEv mice: Evidence for a NMDA receptor defect. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 284:455‐459.
   Lander, E.S. and Schork, N.J. 1994. Genetic dissection of complex traits. Science. 265:2037‐2048.
   Silver, L.M. 1995. Creation of a congenic strain. In Mouse Genetics: Concepts and Applications, Section 3.3.3.2, Oxford University Press, New York.
   Simpson, E.M., Linder, C.C., Sargent, E.E., Davisson, M.T., Mobraaten, L.E., and Sharp, J.J. 1997. Genetic variation among 129 substrains and its importance for targeted mutagenesis in mice. Nature Genet. 16:19‐27.
   Threadgill, D.W., Yee, D., Matin, A., Nadeau, J.H., and Magnuson, T. 1997. Genealogy of the 129 inbred strains: 129SvJ is a contaminated inbred strain. Mammalian Genome 8:390‐393.
   Wakeland, E., Morel, L., Achey, K., Yui, M., and Longmate, J. 1997. Speed congenics: A classic technique in the fast lane (relatively speaking). Immunol. Today 18:472‐477.
Key References
   Banbury Conference on Genetic Background in Mice. 1997. Mutant mice and neuroscience: Recommendations concerning genetic background. Neuron 19:755‐759.
  This viewpoint article reviews many of the concerns regarding the effects of genetic heterogeneity on experimental interpretation. Suggestions for standardized strain backgrounds and mating strategies are presented.
   Silver, L.M. 1995. Mouse genetics: Concepts and applications. Oxford University Press, New York.
  This is a useful and thorough review of the house mouse and its use in genetics. The text is available on line at http://www.princeton.edu/∼lsilver/book/MGcontents.html.
Internet Resources
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