Propagation of Major Plant‐Virus Hosts

Roger Hull1

1 John Innes Centre, Colney, Norwich, United Kingdom
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Microbiology
Unit Number:  Unit 16A.2
DOI:  10.1002/9780471729259.mc16a02s14
Online Posting Date:  August, 2009
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Abstract

Plant viruses are propagated in host plants, which are usually grown in glasshouses, screen houses, or growth cabinets. In most cases, the plants are grown from seed; in some cases, they are propagated as cuttings. This unit describes the basic techniques of growing suitable plants from seed and cuttings. Curr. Protoc. Microbiol. 14:16A.2.1‐16A.2.4. © 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords: seed of host plants; potting composts; growing conditions

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Strategic Planning
  • Basic Protocol 1: Propagation of Major Plant‐Virus Hosts from Seed
  • Basic Protocol 2: Propagation of Major Plant Virus Hosts from Cuttings
  • Commentary
  • Literature Cited
  • Tables
     
 
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Materials

Basic Protocol 1: Propagation of Major Plant‐Virus Hosts from Seed

  Materials
  • Potting compost (see )
  • Seed of required species (some seed can be obtained from seed merchants or garden centers but some may have to be obtained from other research workers)
  • Plant pots or growing modules
  • Insect‐screened glasshouse, screen house, or growth cabinet

Basic Protocol 2: Propagation of Major Plant Virus Hosts from Cuttings

  Materials
  • Mother plants for propagation; these should have nonflowering side shoots suitable for taking cuttings.
  • Rooting powder
  • Rooting compost (see )
  • Propagating frame or plastic bag
  • Mist bench (optional)
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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

   Dijkstra, J. and de Jager, C.P. 1998. Practical Plant Virology: Protocols and Exercises. Springer‐Verlag, Berlin.
   Hill, S.A. 1984. Methods in Plant Virology. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford, U.K.
Key References
   Dijkstra and de Jager, 1998. See above.
  This gives further background and some variations to the technique.
   Hill, 1984. See above.
  This gives further background and some variations to the technique.
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