Hepatic MRI for GE Scanners

Donald G. Mitchell1, Pater Natale1, George Holland1

1 Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Unit Number:  Unit A15.2
DOI:  10.1002/0471142719.mia1502s04
Online Posting Date:  May, 2002
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Abstract

MRI techniques continue to evolve rapidly, but the basic components of a liver examination, and the clinical role of each component, have changed little. The three most important considerations for choosing techniques for imaging the liver continue to be contrast, motion artifact, and coverage. This unit presents a for liver imaging for General Electric (GE) scanners. However, these basic approaches to hepatic MR imaging are quite similar, with most details relating to minor vendorā€specific differences.

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Basic Protocol 1: Liver Imaging
  • Commentary
  • Figures
  • Tables
     
 
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Materials

Basic Protocol 1: Liver Imaging

  Materials
  • Normal saline (0.9% NaCl), sterile, 100 ml minimum
  • Extravascular contrast agent (e.g., Magnevist, Omniscan, or Prohance), 20 ml for most patients
  • 22‐G angiocatheter
  • 110‐in. extension tubing
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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
   Earls, J.P., Rofsky, N.M., Lee, V.S., DeCorato, D.R., Krinsky, G.A., and Weinreb, J.C. 1997. Hepatic arterial‐phase dynamic gadolinium‐enhanced MR imaging: Optimization with a test examination and a power injector. Radiology 202:268‐273.
   Ito, K., Mitchell, D.G., Outwater, E.K., Szklaruk, J., and Sadek, A.G. 1997. Hepatic lesions: Discrimination of nonsolid, benign lesions from solid, malignant lesions with heavily T2‐weighted fast spin‐echo MR imaging. Radiology 204:729‐737.
   Jeong, Y.Y., Mitchell, D.G., and Holland, G. 2001. Liver lesion conspicuity on T2‐weighted breath‐hold fast spin‐echo MR imaging before and after gadolinium administration: Initial experience. Radiology 221:117‐121.
   Marks, B., Mitchell, D.G., and Simelaro, J.P. 1997. Breath‐holding in healthy and pulmonary‐compromised populations: Effects of hyperventilation and oxygen inspiration. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 7:595‐597.
   Shellock, F.G. and Kanal, E. 1996. Magnetic Resonance Bioeffects, Safety, and Patient Management. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia.
Key References
   Shellock and Kanal, 1996. See above.
  Covers a number of important patient management issues related to MR imaging, including recommended safety procedures, a list of metallic implants that have been tested for MR compatibility, and a list of other sources on MR safety.
Internet Resources
  http://www.mri.tju.edu
  A noncommercial site that lists all body MRI protocols, continually updated, updated GE Signa scanners by the Thomas Jefferson University Department of Radiology. Additionally, there are descriptions and explanations of the various pulse sequences, tips for problems solving, and examples of clinical applications.
  http://www.mrisafety.com
  Managed by Frank Shellock, contains updated items regarding MRI safety and compatibility.
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