Contrast

Azim Celik1, Weili Lin2

1 General Electric Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 2 The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Unit Number:  Unit B6.3
DOI:  10.1002/0471142719.mib0603s04
Online Posting Date:  May, 2002
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Abstract

Contrast (Azim Celik, General Electric Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Weili Lin, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina). SNR (signal‐to‐noise ratio) determines the effectiveness of an imaging experiment. However, even the highest SNR does not guarantee the usefulness of an image. An important aim of imaging for diagnostic purposes is to be able to distinguish between diseased and neighboring normal tissues. If the imaging method used does not have a signal‐manipulating mechanism which produces different signals for the diseased and normal tissues, then distinguishing the two tissues is not possible. This unit provides a detailed discussion of the contrast‐producing mechanisms that arise from the signal dependence on a wide variety of tissue parameters.

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Overview
  • Technical Discussion
  • Figures
  • Tables
     
 
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Materials

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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
   Rose, A. 1985. Vision: Human and Electronic. Plenum Press, New York.
Key References
   Constable, R.T. and Henkelman, R.M. 1991. Contrast, resolution, and detectability in MR imaging. J. Comput. Assist. Tomogr. 15:297.
  The contrast and visibility in MR images are well described in this paper.
   Haacke, E.M., Brown, R.W., Thompson, M.R., and Venkatesan, R. 1999. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Physical Principles and Sequence Design. John‐Wiley & Sons, New York.
  The inherent contrast mechanisms along with contrast‐to‐noise ratio is well described in this text.
   Venkatesan, R. and Haacke, E.M. 1997. Role of high resolution in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging: Applications to MR angiography, intracranial T1‐weighted imaging, and image interpolation. Int. J. Imaging Sys. Technol. 8:529.
  The contrast and visibility in MR images are well described in this paper.
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