Real‐Time Ultrasound‐Guided Needle Injection of the Mouse Jugular Vein

Dominique Abrahams1, Yolaine Jeune‐Smith2, Aimee Bode1, Margaret Baldwin1, Jung W. Choi3

1 University of South Florida, Division of Comparative Medicine, Tampa, Florida, 2 Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, 3 Department of Cancer Imaging and Metabolism and Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Mouse Biology
Unit Number:   
DOI:  10.1002/9780470942390.mo140042
Online Posting Date:  September, 2014
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Abstract

This unit describes a novel method for direct venous injection into mice that offers potentially significant advantages over commonly used mouse vein injection techniques. This is achieved via percutaneous needle placement into the mouse jugular vein under real‐time B‐mode ultrasound (US) imaging. Real‐time US imaging of the injection process allows for immediate determination of the overall success of injection. Unique, and potentially significant, advantages of this technique over others include: (1) direct visual confirmation of needle tip placement in the lumen of the vein, (2) immediate visual detection of extravascular extravasation of injectate, when compared to blinded techniques, such as tail vein injections, and (3) reduced morbidity and mortality compared to surgical vascular access techniques (i.e., jugular vein cannulation). This technique may lead to more accurate determination of the success of the injection procedure for each mouse, thus improving the quality of acquired data in dependent mouse experiments. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 4:141‐150 © 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords: mouse vein injection; mouse jugular vein; ultrasound guided injection; jugular vein injection; tail vein injection

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Basic Protocol 1: Mouse Preparation and Anesthesia
  • Basic Protocol 2: Securing the Mouse to the Imaging Platform and Localizing the Jugular Vein Under Real‐Time Ultrasound
  • Commentary
  • Figures
     
 
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Materials

Basic Protocol 1: Mouse Preparation and Anesthesia

  Materials
  • Mice
  • Depilatory cream (Nair hair remover cream)
  • Sterile water (squirt container)
  • Manual hair clippers
  • Small animal inhalational isoflurane anesthetic chamber
  • 2 × 2–in. gauze pads

Basic Protocol 2: Securing the Mouse to the Imaging Platform and Localizing the Jugular Vein Under Real‐Time Ultrasound

  Materials
  • Mouse (prepared as in protocol 1)
  • Isopropyl alcohol swabs
  • Sterile ultrasound transmission gel (Aquasonics 100 sterile ultrasound transmission gel pouches, Parker Laboratories)
  • Disposable gloves
  • Small animal inhalational isoflurane anesthetic chamber
  • Small animal sonographic imaging system (Visualsonics Vevo 2100 system)
  • Medical‐grade tape (3M Transpore tape)
  • Sterile 1‐ml tuberculin syringe
  • Sterile 1‐in. 30‐G needle
  • Stereotactic microinjection apparatus
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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
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Internet Resources
  http://www.informatics.jax.org/cookbook/
  This publically available online mouse anatomy atlas contains more detailed schematics of the mouse neck vessels (Image 100) and mouse neck soft tissues (Image 45).
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