Classic In Vivo Cancer Models: Three Examples of Mouse Models Used in Experimental Therapeutics

Anna Kruczynski1, Bridget T. Hill1

1 Centre de Recherche Pierre Fabre, Cedex
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Pharmacology
Unit Number:  Unit 5.24
DOI:  10.1002/0471141755.ph0524s15
Online Posting Date:  February, 2002
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Abstract

Transplantable animal tumors have been associated with the discovery of most clinically active anticancer agents. They are still useful today in conducting detailed evaluations of new candidate anticancer drugs. Three protocols relating to transplantable experimental tumors are described in this unit. Included are the intravenously‐implanted murine P388 leukemia, the subcutaneously‐implanted murine B16 melanoma and two examples of subcutaneously‐implanted human tumor xenografts, the LX‐1 (lung) and MX‐1 (breast) tumors.

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Strategic Planning
  • Basic Protocol 1: Intravenously Implanted Murine P388 Leukemia
  • Basic Protocol 2: Subcutaneously Implanted Murine B16 Melanoma
  • Basic Protocol 3: Two Examples of Subcutaneously‐Implanted Human Tumor Xenografts, LX‐1 (Lung) and MX‐1 (Breast) Tumors
  • Reagents and Solutions
  • Commentary
  • Literature Cited
  • Figures
     
 
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Materials

Basic Protocol 1: Intravenously Implanted Murine P388 Leukemia

  Materials
  • Murine P388 leukemia cell suspensions (Division of Cancer Treatment, Tumor Repository, NCI, Frederick): store in liquid nitrogen up to 1 year in 1 × 106 cells/ml suspensions prepared from ascitic fluid in 90% calf serum and 10% DMSO
  • 0.9% (w/v) NaCl (i.e., saline), sterile
  • ≥18‐g female DBA/2 mice (DBA/2JIco; Iffa Credo)
  • Bacterial culture media: thioglycollate (BioMérieux)
  • Trypan blue (Merck)
  • Female hybrid CDF1 mice (CD2F1/CrlBR, Charles River)
  • Test compound solutions prepared in the appropriate vehicle according to their solubility
  • Test compound vehicle without test compound
  • Sterile 1‐ml syringes with 26‐G needles
  • Sterile scissors and forceps
  • Malassez slides with a grid to allow cell counting and cover slips (Merck)
  • 5‐ml sterile tubes with cap, ice cold
  • Balance for weighing animals

Basic Protocol 2: Subcutaneously Implanted Murine B16 Melanoma

  Materials
  • Murine B16 melanoma tumor fragments (Division of Cancer Treatment, Tumor Repository, NCI, Frederick): store up to 1 year in 90% calf serum and 10% DMSO in liquid nitrogen
  • Female C57BL/6 mice (C57BL/6 NCrlBR, Charles River)
  • Bacterial culture media (thioglycollate; BioMérieux)
  • Dubosc‐Brasil solution (see recipe)
  • Test compound solutions prepared in the appropriate vehicle (according to their solubility)
  • Test compound vehicle without test compound, fresh
  • 0.9% (w/v) NaCl (saline), ice cold
  • Razor blade or scalpel
  • Sterile 2.5‐mm diameter trocars
  • Sterile scissors and forceps
  • Calipers
  • Sterile 1‐ml syringes with 26‐G needles
  • Dounce tissue homogenizer
  • Sterile gauze
  • Balance for weighing animals

Basic Protocol 3: Two Examples of Subcutaneously‐Implanted Human Tumor Xenografts, LX‐1 (Lung) and MX‐1 (Breast) Tumors

  Materials
  • Human LX‐1 (lung) or MX‐1 (breast) tumor fragments (Division of Cancer Treatment, Tumor Repository, NCI): store up to 1 year in liquid nitrogen in 90% calf serum and 10% DMSO
  • Homozygous female athymic nude mice (Ico:Swiss‐nu/nu, Iffa Credo)
  • Dubosc‐Brasil solution (see recipe)
  • Test compound solutions prepared in the appropriate vehicle (according to their solubility)
  • 0.9% (w/v) NaCl, sterile (saline)
  • Sterile 2.5‐mm‐diameter trocars
  • Razor blade or scalpel
  • Sterile scissors and forceps
  • Sterile 1‐ml syringes with 26‐G needles
  • Balance for weighing animals
  • Calipers
NOTE: House mice as described (see ), except with the following modifications: maintain humidity at 65% ± 5% and temperature at 25° ± 1°C, autoclave drinking water, and house animals in filter‐top cages in positive pressure ventilated cabinets.
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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
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