A Simple Light Stimulation of Caenorhabditis elegans

Kun He Lee1, Michael Aschner1

1 Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York
Publication Name:  Current Protocols in Toxicology
Unit Number:  Unit 11.21
DOI:  10.1002/0471140856.tx1121s67
Online Posting Date:  February, 2016
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Abstract

Response via noxious stimulus can be an important indicator of sensory neuron function and overall health of an organism. If the stimulation is quick and simple, and the animal can be rescued afterwards, such a method not only allows for assays pertaining to changed sensory ability after various treatments, but also increases the reliability of the statistical relationships that are established. This protocol demonstrates a stimulation assay in Caenorhabditis elegans, using blue light from common laboratory equipment: the fluorescent microscope. The nematode detects blue light using a set of amphid ciliary sensory neurons, and blue light is detrimental to its overall health after a prolonged exposure. However, under brief exposure, blue light stimulation provides a rapid and easy method for quantifying sensory functions and health without harming the animal. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Keywords: Caenorhabditis elegans; stimulation; threshold; blue light

     
 
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Table of Contents

  • Basic Protocol 1: Quantification of Stimulation Threshold in c. Elegans Using Blue Light from Fluorescent Dissecting Microscope
  • Reagents And Solutions
  • Commentary
  • Literature Cited
  • Figures
     
 
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Materials

Basic Protocol 1: Quantification of Stimulation Threshold in c. Elegans Using Blue Light from Fluorescent Dissecting Microscope

  Materials
  • Caenorhabditis elegans (hermaphrodites or males; developmental stage of interest)
  • Nematode growth medium (NGM) agar in 30‐ or 60‐mm petri dish (see recipe)
  • OP50 in LB broth (see recipe)
  • 37°C incubator (Lab‐Line Instruments, model no. 150)
  • Paper towel
  • Platinum wire‐pick
  • Dissecting microscope with fluorescence (Leica MZ16 FA, Arc Lamp Power Supply, HBO 100 DC IGN; Leica Microsystems, cat. no. 990014)
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Figures

Videos

Literature Cited

Literature Cited
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