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Current Protocols in Plant Biology

Current Protocols in Plant Biology

Last Update: March 03, 2017
ISBN: 978-1-119-07736-7

Overview

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What's New in Current Protocols in Plant Biology
Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2017

Whole-Plant Manual and Image-Based Phenotyping in Controlled Environments
         Abstract | Full Text:  HTML   PDF

A Guide to Genome-Wide Association Mapping in Plants
         Abstract | Full Text:  HTML   PDF

Characterization of Plant Small RNAs by Next Generation Sequencing
         Abstract | Full Text:  HTML   PDF

Genotyping-by-Sequencing
         Abstract | Full Text:  HTML   PDF

Metaphase Chromosome Preparation from Soybean (Glycine max) Root Tips
         Abstract | Full Text:  HTML   PDF

Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Glycine max Metaphase Chromosomes
         Abstract | Full Text:  HTML   PDF

Published in affiliation with the American Society of Plant Biologists, Current Protocols in Plant Biology provides a curated compilation of current methods that cover all aspects of plant biology with the goal of advancing the progress of plant science research. As with all of the Current Protocols titles, experts from around the globe, many of whom have invented the methods described, contribute their step-by-step protocols and expert advice to ensure that even novice plant biologist can confidently apply these methods to their own research.

A subscription gives you access to all the content in the collection plus four quarterly issues of new and updated content. Current Protocols in Plant Biology covers research in...

• Extraction and analysis of DNA, RNA, proteins
• Chromosome analysis
• Transcriptional analysis
• Protein expression
• Metabolites
• Plant enzymology
• Epigenetics
• Plant genetic transformation
• Mutagenesis
• Arabidopsis, Maize, Poplar, Rice, and Soybean

https://aspb.org/

Edited by: Gary Stacey, Editor-in-Chief (University of Missouri); James Birchler (University of Missouri); Joseph Ecker (The Salk Institute); Cathie Martin (John Innes Centre); Mark Stitt (Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology); Jian-Min Zhou (Chinese Academy of Sciences)

Developmental Editor: Ann Boyle

While the authors, editors, and publisher believe that the specification and usage of reagents, equipment, and devices, as set forth in this book, are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication, they accept no legal responsibility for any errors or omissions, and make no warranty, express or implied, with respect to material contained herein. In view of ongoing research, equipment modifications, changes in governmental regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to the use of experimental reagents, equipment, and devices, the reader is urged to review and evaluate the information provided in the package insert or instructions for each chemical, piece of equipment, reagent, or device for, among other things, any changes in the instructions or indication of usage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important in regard to new or infrequently employed chemicals or experimental reagents. Moreover, the information presented herein is not a substitute for professional judgment, especially as concerns any applications in a clinical setting or the interpretation of results thereby obtained.